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science funding, everyone would be in . >> that's one of my lines. okay and i believe this for a long time. for a long time i was a free market guy i would say there are exceptions. let's not be extremists here. it's okay to have a free market in shoes, there are some things the market can't provide. i would thought obviously science is one of those. you can't necessarily earn a profit on basic science. it doesn't turn an immediate profit. you can't always capture the profit from science your competitor will grab the discovery and earn the profit. therefore will beless science undertaken. it's a typical neoclassical model. it's not going work in the free market. i believe it. it's it turns out it's not the case at all. secondly, the old model that we sort of abide by centuries ago the way science operates is gather data, you exam it, you draw some hypothesis and come up with experiments. and the experiment either confirms or does not confirm it. provisionally confirm or does not confirm the high pot cyst. that's the way science operates. again, that sounds possible but it turns out none of
science and translating it to beautiful narrative that everybody could relate to. so should become one of america's most celebrated and beloved authors. a subset she turned into a different direction. it is a disturbing book, a worrisome book that pointed out that we were doing to ourselves by the careless use of pesticides in many different places. well, since it's meant 1962 any more thought would explain a little more for you about to rachel carson was. she was born in 1907 in this house in springdale, pennsylvania near pittsburgh and allegheny river. she was born about the upstairs bedrooms of this has come with at the time did not have that addition on the right-hand side dish ec. it stopped at the chimney on the right. a simple, modest house, to downstairs into upstairs. there is no central heat, no indoor plumbing. data couplet outhouses up that come to a shed in the front where they occasionally kept the horse. it was a little bit in the??? words.? it wasn't completely in the country, but there is enough property around????????t carson could explore the was often wi
that, but on the theological debate, that's how do you reconcile with science definitively establishes what your what faith teaches? with the age of the earth, there's no conflict. in the beginning, god created the heavens and earth, and the scientific advances allowed us, given us insight into when and how he did it, but i believe god did it. that's how i reconcile that. that's consistent with the teachings of my church. other people have a deeper con flipght. i think in america, we should have the freedom to teach our children whatever we believe, and that means teaching them science. they have to know science, but parents have the right to teach theology and reconcile the two things as they believe and see fit, and i think that's the point the president was making back in 2007 when he was asked the question. that's what i was saying. >> accepting that, how old is the earth? >> science says it's -- my faith teaches it's not inconsistent, but god great created the universe. god creates help and earth, and science gives us insight. the more science learned, the more i'm convinced that
in south florida as great a strain folks at entry point, there is science and progress of human trafficking. awareness part is important. they have to take the place when the internet for law enforcement because a lot of times they find themselves into prostitution and get treated as perpetrator rather than victims. if ecologists force them into a perpetrator but in fact we are the dems and they have to give him for certain judicial system to treat a women as victims and put them in a setting with a pull themselves away from drug addiction or whatever it's supposed appendices seem to keep them trapped. >> first i want to ask you a couple twitter questions that have come in what we've been talking here. one is who's the best meter in washington? >> robert griffing. [laughter] >> why did the majority of americans reject the republican party? >> i think it was an election. it was a very close election when he looked than others and differences between. there is their free enterprise may maintain we need to improve on the way they connect those policies of the everyday life of everyday people.
. and for those who are unfamiliar with the term "stem" it stands for science, technology, engineering, and math. the hard sciences that we have too few in terms of graduates from our colleges and universities. this bill passed in the house of representatives with 245 votes, and was originally sponsored by my friend and colleague, lamar smith of texas, and is very similar to a piece of legislation i myself have introduced earlier this year. the goal of this legislation is one that i think is -- enjoys broad bipartisan support, and that is to help the united states retain more of the highly skilled immigrants who come to study at our colleges and universities. in particular, this bill would make eligible for a green card those who graduate in the stem fields who get a master's degree or a ph.d. and so we would not add to the net number of green cards that would be eligible, there is 55,000 diversity lottery visa green cards that would be substituted for by these stem green cards. now, we all know that america's immigration system is broken, and, unfortunately, it's a self-inflicted wound in many
getting equal pay or moving ahead is so few women take on science, technology, education and math. i went to school as an engineer in the 80s and was the only woman in the program. ten years later i still don't find any women who become save the engineers the way i did. is there a way to push the younger generation to take those harder courses and break those barriers? >> there is some work to do that and the educational system is stepping up to do that but then you come up against the situation they discovered at yale, that even though women have the same qualifications they are not treated equally. >> we have to encourage women. that is one area in technology and science where women have not made has significant a role as they have in law and medicine and it starts early. it starts in kindergarten where you have to encourage that. i saw the same study but be that as it may women make a lot more money -- [talking over each other] >> in the liberal arts. >> something you want to say? we have time for one more question. >> no, go ahead. the other people talk. >> sandra fluke went to orgasm
value-added economy and that doesn't just mean skills like math and science although we are lagging behind 30 or 40 other countries in the world in that regard. it also means skills associated with creativity and innovation because our edge as a country comes in the area where we can use our creativity but we also protect creativity in a way that places like china and others don't. in a content driven world, software driven world, that combination of creative people, a system that promotes and protect creativity is probably the real ace in the hole. >> host: let's take bob's comment and tie that to your previous book superclass. you have mentioned we are creating a class of people way up here and everyone else is being left behind in a sense. >> guest: the gap is growing between the ridges 1% and the rest of us. they have benefited more than anyone else in the course of the past week in years. most of the gains that have come with 90% of the gains that have come from the last expansion went to them. people at the bottom of society are more likely to stay there than ever before. we u
with science definitively established with what you may think -- for me when it comes to the age of the earth there is a concept a i believe god created the heavens and earth. i think the scientific advances have allowed us to have given us insight into when he did and how did you but i still believe god did. that's the i been able to reconcile that. other people have a keeper -- i think in america we should have the freedom to teach our children whatever it is we believe. that means teaching them size. they have to know the science but also parents have the right to have theology and reconcile that. as they believe in secret. i think that's the point the president was making. back in 2007 when he was asked that question. that's what i was saying. >> we will accept it in the context. >> our faith, my faith says god created the universe. he created the beginning out of nothing. god created the heaven and the earth's. scientists have decided we needed and how he did it. the more sides learned, the more i'm convinced that god created it. [inaudible] >> later returned to the catholic church. spin
in the global race by switching from current spending to capital investment in science, roads and education. we offer new support for business and enterprise so they can create the jobs we need. and in everything we do we will show today we are on the side of those who want to work hard and get on. mr. speaker, the office for budget responsibility has today produced its latest economic forecast, and it is a measure of the constitutional achievement that it has taken for granted that our country's forecast is now produced independently of the treasury, free from the political interference of the past. i want to thank robert choate, his fellow members of the budget respondent committee and all their staff for their rigorous approach. one of the advantages of the creation of the abr is that not only do we get independent forecasts, we also get an independent explanation of why the forecasts are as they are. if, for example, lower rates was the result of of the government's fiscal policy, they would say so, but they do not. they say the economy has performed less strongly than expected -- >> [laugh
kiersten a senior political science major at colorado state university. he would think is a graduating senior at the number one thing i would care about would be getting a job. and i guess in a way that's what a lot of people are thinking about. but i actually want to be a local government practitioner. and so i'm thinking about the debt in a totally different way. i think if we allow things to go as they are or make a decision that isn't the right decision, will find yourself unable to provide service is to local areas that we have promised, that we need and i hope to one day be a paradise. in in addition to that, fix that has amazing core principle is that regardless of where you come from, you can find a way to rally around. so reducing spending, tax reform and entitlement reform are all thinks he can come to the table and talk about. i am here urging that uses do that. thanks. >> thank you very much. finally we'll hear from wanda rohm, founder and owner presto prints and in san antonio. she's a long-standing advocate for small and women owned businesses. >> i think being a small bu
. >>guest: thank you. there is a science to them in the imitators i cannot speak for. but they are imitators so that says something. >>caller: yes it does your hangers are wonderful!! >>guest: happy holidays and i guess you are getting a gift bag for yourself as well. >>caller: [laughter] [laughter] >>host: the yugo mirijam thank you. --there you go. gorgeous! we know we love6 c13 hangers. the bag is a really special added bonus. >>guest: look how big it is. to fit 36 hangers. you put echo in here and give it as a gift.--a coat >>guest: i do not think i have ever seen this many people on the telephone number. call now do not miss out because i think it goes away when we do. >>host: it does. it goes away when we go away. [laughter] >>guest: i am not going there. if you are going to part with it as a gift do not forget about the guys.from their suits, shirts. you your husband colleen, if you are fighting over hangers, give him a gift.1-36 pack in the color he wants. >>host: purple sold out, go to your next favorite color. >>guest: we still have ruby red? >>host: we will track. t
'll be joint staffers who are doing the real science and math on this on exactly what formations, what capabilities, and, therefore, how many civilians and military need to remain. i think that if you go to one end of the spectrum and go with just a few thousand soldiers, that's not enough to really secure yourself or do either too well. i think that's what my own research is doing. talking to a lot of smarter people in the week here in the capital region. if you go very large, you could run the risk of having the security forces from afghanistan become too reliant in those areas upon us because we're there taking care of them. i think they can be mitigated, i really do. there's got to be a really good, i think, science to exactly how you approach troops to task based upon the missions that we're given. that really is what needs to happen militarily. economically, we've got to stay informed in the -- invested in the region. you've got to have security forces. it's a sustainable force that works for afghans in the outyears. at the same time, diplomatically you've got to continue reconci
, and the science and medical industry that we have to embrace that and act accordingly but i am pleased with the players association and the nfl and encouraging their players to come out and engage parents to talk about what is going on and parents are asking hard questions but in the end you want to be informed demand there is a movement. there are steps being taken to try to address this complex issue and the conversation will continue but they are definitely engaging. >> this conversation started with the idea of 14 and under so i will give you the comment. >> thanks very much. let me wrap quickly by saying what i started with, it is great that all of us understand no brain trauma, we are not paranoid about it, you can reduce it or every chance you get to eliminate it short of stopping something completely is a good thing. i am very encouraged by what i have heard today, because the bus that has been driving is going in. i am proud of what the national football league has done, or working with the players association collectively what they did in the collective bargaining agreement,
be a different story. christian science believe children should not be taken to the doctor when they are ill, has also been litigated successfully. some forms of so-called alternative medical treatment have led to abuse and neglect convictions. it is important to treat all these cases to get there. is there a substantial burden on the parents's religious freedom and if so does it compelling public interest justify the imposition of this burden? now to the burqa. the burqa for minors is not in the same class as genital mutilation, it is not irreversible and does not endanger health or impair other bodily function. we will get to the whole argument in a minute but i will say more about that. if it is imposed by physical or sexual violence and that violence ought to be legally punished. otherwise, however, it seems to be in the same category of all sorts of requirements, pleasant and uncared pleasant for parents impose on their children listen practices of this type do appear to violate laws against child save chief. that is one law professor amy shoea submitted in her pocketbook the tiger mother th
not a science. and hopefully will be able to make a dent in that kind of -- that's what and those people will never admit they were wrong but it's -- i'm reading about for light reading i'm reading about -- [inaudible] [laughter] [applause] i think tonight -- [applause] i think tonight we brought a lot of life to this audience and the questions that economics and the challenge behind it. i'm grateful to you both. thank you for the discussion. thanks a lot for being here. [applause] >>> we'd like to hear from you. tweet us your feedback, twitter.com/booktv. >>> and now joining us on booktv is an old washington hand and that is ambassador stewart. he's an author, the future of jews is the name of the book. ambassador, why are you writing a book about the future of the jews? >> we have survived 3,000 years of calamityies and we survived and leave thrived and contributed to societies even those that didn't want us. now we have a whole new set of 21st century challenges, and the question is having survived those terrible times, can we now survive prosperity, success, and integration? and i lo
, in political science, and, you know, norm knows more than i do, but look at house majority parties, hey, that tells us a lot how they behave today. they try to structure the environment in a way to win, and they do so by controlling the agenda and preventing minorities to participate in the legislative process. that's not a surprise to anyone. that's what's done in the senate today and that's not the way the senate has been run. there's a number of tools that they have at their di poe sure to do that. third is filing cloture. we're familiar with that. filing cloture is something done out of weakness by the party, but it's actually a tool for the majority, a weak tool, but it is a tool to provide certainty, limit on amendments under circumstances, and allows the symbolic gesture on their part to create a line, a demarcation, clear for people who are for and against something. in the house, you do that with a closed roll, whatever you want. i think more egregiously, we have the same day closure. typically, you file cloture, the idea is the bill's on theññr fl, filibuster it, and the maj
is with us. the science is clear. national security establishments all know that this is real. there is a rearguard action in this building but i polluters to try to prevent us in taking action on this. we have to face the fact that deniers are wrong. they are just dead wrong. whatever motivations may be, they are wrong and we have to deal with that and i think some of the courtesy we've given to one another collegially really have to yield to the fact that some of the things said in the senate and equitably in this committee chamber just plain wrong. sandy shows the price of not being attentive to these facts in a thank you for your leadership, madam chair. >> senator, i want to thank you for your remarks. i feel, as you do, that the clock is ticking and hurricane sandy has shown us all what the scientist sitting right in this room today i got the goupil all were sitting right there and told us exactly what would happen and it's all happening. you can close your eyes and cover your ears and put a pillow over your head, but anyone with a heart beat and he pulls can tell that t
equipment, in r&d, in science education and infrastructure and so forth. the question many people, sir, don't want to consider is where do we get those resources with those enormous debts? i asked our research department if they would make a reasonable prediction of how important interest costs would be if we did nothing, and their estimate without any explosion in interest rates was as follows: within 25 years or so, our interest costs would jump from about 1% of the gdp to 12% of the gdp or roughly four times the total investment made in r&d, science education and infrastructure. and if we ever permit that to happen, we will have assured that we're going to have what i call a slow growth crisis. and that's at least my way of formulating what happens if we don't do anything. but, mike, please, take over. this is your meeting, not mine. >> well, one of the things i don't claim to be here is an economics expert, although it's from a national security standpoint, and i've felt this way for years, that it's not just about the health of our economy, it's around the world, it's the health of eco
upon restrictions not supported by sound science. so now i'm going to tell you about some problems i have with russia even though i want russia to be in the w.t.o. and i want this legislation to pass so it can be fully implemented. now i would say some things that we have problems. let's take pork exports as an example. in 2008, u.s. pork sales to russia totaled over 200,000 metric tons, and since that time, exports have fallen nearly 60% due to russia's reduced import quotas and questionable sanitary and phyto sanitary restrictions. i'm pleased our trade negotiators were able to negotiate a satisfactory trade rate quota for our pork, but this administration under president obama has fallen short in its obligation to stand up with u.s. farmers on these sanitary and phyto-sanitary standards. in other words, using sound science instead of some i illegitimate reason for keeping our products out of russia. i have communicated time and again what i expected of this administration because they have to negotiate for us. in june 2011, i led a bipartisan letter with senators nelson and 26 oth
a speech in which he says he wants to use the tax hike to invest in training, education, science and research. when you're in a deep, deep hole, you're borrowing almost 40 cents of every dollar you spend, shouldn't you constrain yourself and not start new programs? or if you start a new needed program, shouldn't you reduce some less valuable program to pay for it instead of just taxing to create more programs? so not once in the speech did he discuss entitlements. it's the largest item in our government, entitlements. not once did the president of the united states discuss with the american people the problem of social security, medicare, medicaid are on an unsustainable path and are at great risk. shouldn't the president honestly talk to the american people about that? he didn't discuss our $16 trillion debt and how the debt commission that he appointed indicates that we're on an unsustainable path heading to a fiscal crisis. he did not discuss that. or the economic catastrophe that could occur if we don't get off this unsustainable path. the president should lead on these thing
objection, so ordered. mr. coburn: advances in biological science have changed the way we view disease. we now recognize the dysfunction of specific biochemical pathways. not disease specific pathways, biochemical pathways that govern cell behavior that may be similar in specifically disparate diseases or quite different in patients with the same disease. so what they're saying to you through this letter is that of course they're going to do what we tell them to do. but the very intent of what we're wanting to accomplish is you're going to delay the outcome. because we haven't significantly in the last three years, significantly increased n.i.h.'s budget, so limited dollars are going to be spent as directed through this recalcitrant bill that aren't going to direct the translational research and biochemical pathway research that they're in. and i would just tell my colleagues, in the next ten years, we're going to see such phenomenal changes in -- in our approach to disease and the treatments for that. and the reason we're going to see it is because we quit looking at diseases and we start
is with us, the science is clear, our national security establishments, our business communities all know that this is real. there is a rear guard action in this building led by polluters to try to prevent us from taking action on this but we have to face the fact that the deniers are wrong. they are just plain dead wrong. whatever their motivations may be and that is a separate question, they are wrong. we have to deal with that and i think some of the courtesies we have given to one another collegiality really have to yield to the fact that other things being said in the senate and occasionally regrettably in this committee chamber are just plain wrong but sandy shows the price of not being attentive to these facts and i thank you for your leadership. >> i want to thank you for your remarks. i feel as you do that the clock is ticking and hurricane sandy have shown us all what the scientists sitting right in this room the day i got the gavel told us exactly what would happen and it is all happening. you can close your eyes and cover your ears and put a pillow over your head, but anyone w
. but the real issue is one of agenda control. we actually have a way to think about this. in political science. if you look at the way that the house majority parties behave, it tells us a lot about way that senate majority trying to behave today. they try to structure the environment in such a way that they can win. and they do sell by controlling the agenda and preventing the minorities from participating. that is not a surprise to anyone. that is what is being done in the senate today and that is not the way the senate has traditionally been run. there are a number of tools. the first one is something we are all familiar with. the filing closure is something that is done at a weakness on the majority party because the majority is struggling. it is actually a tool for the majority compared to what the house does. it is a tool that provides certainty in the process and it allows a symbolic gesture on their part to create a demarcation that is very clear when people are against something. it is the only way to do this. in the house come you can do it with a close rule whenever you want. i thin
events are allowed the office of science and technology policy to identify work apps are. you can discuss value in a couple different ways. primarily whether it is valuable to democracy and people holding the government accountable, or valuable to companies such as members of my coalition of want to use it for new business opportunities or both. our coalition focuses on both vote for democracy and business opportunities are still not disclosed or standardized. although there is incremental progress without a legislative agenda, i think the white house can't get there. >> this is good and that leads us to the causal part of the program of the convening, perhaps. so we were talking about institutionalization. we have seen efforts along those lines. the open government initiative and direct it, although it certainly hasn't -- it's translated into something to get agencies moving in the same direction. we saw more of the principle problem with the leadership is saying do this and agencies were saying no, no. it was the mid-level folks. some of this is perhaps a one point ethics czar. norm ici
. jekyll technology parts. >> science, technology, engineering and math are fundamental to the growth of the economy and the united states obviously has work to do, my oldest daughter is doing her doctorate in math. there's a substantial contribution to national security in any case. with respect to the dr. jekyll and mr. hyde bit, economic growth is fundamental and innovation is the key engine for that and freedom is the foundation for that. i think we will see this play out in interesting ways globally including within china, and as we work to have a very open system economically and take advantage of technology, we also need to look at what needs to be done to deal with the threats of not just cyber but biotech and so on and look at doing that in partnership, and the partners we look at, and a substantial conversation about the rules of the road in cyberspace, we do that with many others, a fundamental issue. >> got a little bit from global security, the issue of the islands is primarily an issue of energy, and we are seeing it all over the world today, we don't have good mechanism
times the total investment made of r&d, science and education. if we permit that to happen we are assured a slow-growth crisis that is what will happen if we don't do anything. mike, please takeover. >> i don't claim to be an economics expert. but from the national security standpoint i have felt for years not just the health of our economy around the world but those that generate positive outcome and from the defense standpoint as pointed out if said that continues to grow it will continue to eat at us and when you put in good time bomb of the sequestration it was supposed to be so heinous that congress would never permit it to happen but yet we're on the verge andover what we have been fighting over the last decade at a time when there is clearly increasing pressure on the defense budget and i have said it should pay its fair share. with the media impact to get to a part of your question and i worry about the acceleration to create a hollow force very rapidly. and the president does what he says he will he takes it off the books of any cuts with the totality focused on a ver
the 60th anniversary of the graduate research fellowship program of the senate science foundation. the presiding officer: is there objection to proceeding to the measure? without objection. mr. cardin: i further ask that the resolution be agreed to, the preamble be agreed to, the motion to reconsider be laid on the table with no intervening action or debate and any statements related to the matter be printed at the appropriate place in the record as if read. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. cardin: mr. president, i ask unanimous consent that when the senate completes its business today it adjourn until 9:30 a.m. on thursday, december 6, 2012, that following the prayer and pledge, the journal be approved to date, the morning business be deemed expired and the time for the leaders be reserved for the use later in the day. that following the leaders' remarks the senate be in a period of morning business until 11:45 a.m. with senators permitted to speak therein for up to ten minutes each with the previous order regarding retirement speeches remaining in effect and followi
than myself and the big pocket it lined with drusy. >>host: there you had it. there the science behind that it is fascinating and it is interestingtalk about these rocks that literally date back 500 million years. that is the outside and inside you have little pockets little cavities with the herkimer form in order for us to create the today's special you go through and sort only the best rough. this is best of the best. it top grade quality is not get better for a hardcover. if you are looking an earring with sparkle and pizazz and personality -- it does not get better than the herkimer.getting these. these a so much fun. they are a starter they will say those earrings are beautiful what are you wearing? when you give these as a gift they will not it you can only find herkimer today's special boutique. in japan they love her car. -- herkimer, nobody sells it for less than $50.this is a special one day only offer. read the in pennsylvania who is shopping today. -- ritahere that you had ordered for pairs >>caller: one pair for me and three pairs as christmas gifts. it will be hard
quite a successful science company in our state for over 200 years. we have cars. we built a lot of cars over the years, g.m. and chrysler products. over half of the new york stock exchange, half the fortune 500, being credit card business in our state. the coast of our state is the site of the nation's summer capital, rehoboth beach and a bunch of other places. the letter "c" has been pretty big. people say why do they call you the first state? we're the first colony that threw off the yoke of the british tyranny and at the same time said pennsylvania take a hike, we want to be a state on our own. 225 years from tomorrow to be exact, the first state to ratify the constitution. but we have the best beaches in the country. last year i think there were four or five-star beaches in america, two in delaware. rehoboth and dewey. the best air force base in the world. we have, i think, the finest judiciary, finest judicial system in the state. we have the best financial controls and financial controls and cash management system. we have a triple-a credit rate system. we continue to have that ki
he received. this is obviously an area of science that isn't totally well understood. i talked to doctor about it and others. there's more evidence that suggests that pretty strong connection there. but we already know that brain trauma is a big part of contact sports in football particularly. that's not really something being debated at this point. the question i have is sort of we're all talking about limiting the risk here. we're ibt talking about making things safer and scott acknowledged we can't make the sport safe. we can try to make it safer. but most of the discussions i don't hear talk about what is an acceptable level of risk in the first place. especially with children. obviously with children it's different than talking about adult in the society. and it goes to, you know, socially, culturally, legally, we dpraw sort of -- dpraw sort of different lines. there's a moral question here as well. and i would put this on to everybody, i'm struggling to understand it myself. i don't understand the more i thought about this and the more i report on this t. how football tha
. there's a sports site in the football side and of course the science side. i will let the medical experts talk about the science side. certainly zÜrich and others have been working closely for some time. u.s.a. football have 3 million kids to play tackle football. roughly two-point play flag. it is a great outfit, a great option. in fact we suggest the experience should be flag no matter what age. in addition, we work with pop warner to make them better and safer. if that includes things that really nationally accredited program, using practice plans. most coaches doug is practice plans come as you make sure you have an organized structure prior to his to make sure we have volunteers to come the commissioners, coaches out there putting their time. we need to educate them. certainly every medical expert, every expert on this issue comes back to education being the most critical. u.s.a. football's focus is largely about education. we provide the best resources we can to make sure those folks are prepared. literally down to drills that have 3-d animations. you can literally be in th
or msnbc that catered to a certain audience and psychology and political science because it cognitive discipline. people tune in to what they want to hear and get their views reinforced. talk radio was just beginning to flourish and you didn't have the internet. the internet now has a content ratio of information coming over the internet very, very high. and get 50% of people get their information of the internet. and the sites dillinger here to get this passed along. these are not what i would call efforts to bring us together. these tend to be polarizing mechanisms that make it more difficult to achieve a compromise. the speaker were to go off and cut a deal by the time he's back on capitol hill with sean hannity they didn't make it. the members phones lit up like a christmas tree, the switchboards of angry people to talk about what they've heard. it makes it very difficult for the members that there is another factor that has come in that isn't talked about as much but it's equally important at least in the mind of policy makers and that is the fact that campaign financing has chan
energy and commerce committee. science is clear. cutting carbon emissions over the long term is key to reducing the risk of extreme weather. so i thank you for the opportunity to testify, and look forward to working together to help our fellow americans feel from hurricanes and, to ensure that we're all better prepared for similar storms of the future. thank you so much. >> thank you represented. and i would go -- welcome. >> thank you, madam chairman. very much appreciate the invitation to speak before this committee today. i am very proud to represent staten island and brooklyn. staten island was one of the hardest hit areas of all new york city. i was on the ground from the moment the storm started. the amount of devastation that i saw was unimaginable. 24 staten islanders lost their lives. families lost everything. homes were literally torn off their foundations. some collapsed. large boats, yachts were scattered deepened the neighborhoods piled up on two peoples homes. more than 100,000 were without power for weeks. people slept in a cold, damp home, and for his of to move to a
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33